The havoc depression wreaks: Instability.

One of the many things that I am grateful Kevin has brought into my life,
is something I had not experienced before:
stability.

His life is rooted in:

  • having a large circle of good friends he sees regularly, as far as being mid-to-late 30-year-old men goes; two friends are our housemates (of sorts),
  • a close nuclear family who spend time together and are in touch with one another often,
  • a six-year-old job with many of the same colleagues, and
  • living in the same place the past six years.

(These are all protective factors of depression, btw. Meaning, these are some life variables that deter depressive symptoms from developing in a person. It mostly has to do with having close-knit networks of friends and family, AKA support. You can find research articles with more info about protective factors on Google Scholar here.)

One of the side effects of having depression that doesn’t get a lot of airplay is the instability-havoc it wreaks on a person’s life. Experiencing drastic or significant mood changes in a short period of time does more than just make someone appear to be “moody.”

  • Your ability to think clearly,
  • finish a coherent sentence, or
  • stay awake for a whole day for work —

they– like all habitual things one does in a day,
will not fall into a regular pattern
that a person living with depression can depend on and expect.

As a person living with chronic depression:

  • Your social contact drops so regularly that some friends stop inviting you out, or
  • your “negative energy” is a drag to be around, or
  • you’re weird and awkward, and you talk about morbid and sad things, or

you have no choice but to hide
because
your anxiety about being around other people is so
intense
it keeps you paralyzed in bed.

**
I’ve been meaning to get back into a regular meditation practice. I’m excited to bring Kevin to try it with me at a Buddhist temple. When I asked if he would be willing to go with me, he looked at me and said, “OK, but I’m not going to one of those sensory deprivation camps.”

To which I lifted my left brow with a quizzical side-stare and responded, “You mean the 10-day silent meditation retreat?”

**

It’s important to make time for stillness, especially for someone living with depression and their partner. It doesn’t have to be meditation in the traditional sense. Go on a hike or take a walk in your neighborhood.

Are you curious about meditation and its benefits?
Check out this lovely infographic made by @AmandaPage, Editor at HealthCentral.com :: .@HealthCentral.

MindfulnessInfographic_HealthCentral

Repost from Visually :: .@Visually

 

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